FrontRow Classroom Audio Helps Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Posted by Marcia Barahona

4/13/17 10:08 AM

autism-awareness-month-1.pngApril is National Autism Awareness Month and it is an excellent opportunity to promote autism awareness, autism acceptance and to draw attention to the tens of thousands facing an autism diagnosis each year.

FrontRow earned a Certified Autism Resource Badge from the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES)**  for our classroom sound systems and we join in observing this important month. Our certification means that FrontRow’s edtech meets IBCCES criteria for helping improve communication and the classroom environment for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Because FrontRow technology helps compensate for environmental obstacles to learning (background noise and distance from the teacher for example) as well as for communication barriers (limitations in brain development for example), FrontRow classroom audio systems can help students with autism in the areas of speech perception, attention, behavior, seating disparities, and overall classroom success.

Join us in celebrating National Autism Awareness Month with any of the activities being organized by the Autism Society, including:

Some facts and statistics shared by the Autism Society:

  • Prevalence in the United States is estimated at 1 in 68 births. (CDC, 2014)
  • More than 3.5 million Americans live with an autism spectrum disorder. (Buescher et al., 2014)
  • Prevalence of autism in U.S. children increased by 119.4 percent from 2000 (1 in 150) to 2010 (1 in 68). (CDC, 2014)
  • Autism is the fastest-growing developmental disability. (CDC, 2008)

FrontRow welcomes an opportunity to discuss your school’s needs to better serve the student population impacted by ASD. Please contact us with any questions you may have.

** IBCCES is the largest independent credentialing and continuing education organization with a focus in special needs and human services.

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Topics: amplification, audio, Special Education, autism